BU Today

Science & Tech

Catherine West was having no luck. Knee-deep in the cold waters of Dutch Harbor, Alaska, West scanned the rocky seabed for butter clams. The clams had buried themselves in the sand, as clams are wont to do, so she was looking for the telltale siphon—a small tube they stick out, to suck up the nutrient- and oxygen-rich seawater.

“It looks like a black straw,” called her colleague, geologist Fred Andrus, digging on shore.

West stared doubtfully down at the water, a mosaic of sea stars and spiny urchins under the surface. “Everything looks like a black straw,” she said.

West, a College of Arts & Sciences research assistant professor of archaeology, had come to the remote island of Unalaska—800 miles southwest of Anchorage in the Aleutian Islands—for a week in August 2017 to solve a mystery whose answers date back thousands of years. The butter clams, if the scientists could find some, were to be a critical piece of evidence.

Read the full story here

+ Comments
Barbara Moran, Senior Science Writer
Barbara Moran

Barbara Moran can be reached at [email protected].

Post Your Comment

(never shown)

<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></cite>
<del id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></del>
<var id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></var>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite>
<ins id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></ins><menuitem id="ZNHHTXR"><video id="ZNHHTXR"><thead id="ZNHHTXR"></thead></video></menuitem>
<var id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></var>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"><var id="ZNHHTXR"></var></span></cite>
<ins id="ZNHHTXR"></ins>
<var id="ZNHHTXR"><video id="ZNHHTXR"></video></var>
<ins id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"><cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite></span></ins>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite><cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite><var id="ZNHHTXR"></var>
<var id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></var>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"></cite>
<cite id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"><var id="ZNHHTXR"></var></span></cite><ins id="ZNHHTXR"><span id="ZNHHTXR"></span></ins>
  • 4365291427 2018-02-17
  • 9968661426 2018-02-17
  • 6146681425 2018-02-17
  • 2647651424 2018-02-17
  • 7013081423 2018-02-17
  • 8223371422 2018-02-17
  • 1484911421 2018-02-17
  • 7547221420 2018-02-17
  • 7125541419 2018-02-17
  • 2476771418 2018-02-17
  • 2237071417 2018-02-17
  • 1585271416 2018-02-17
  • 88501415 2018-02-17
  • 8182281414 2018-02-17
  • 4195251413 2018-02-17
  • 4179441412 2018-02-16
  • 8211901411 2018-02-16
  • 74411410 2018-02-16
  • 5097601409 2018-02-16
  • 3095561408 2018-02-16